Roasted Carrots with Carrot Top Pesto

Save these gems from the compost bin, add some maple syrup and ginger, and you have a delicious pesto!

I have to admit, most of the time I have used carrot greens, or tops, as an addition to the stock pot so as not to waste them, or occasionally added a few leaves to salads. But I was really ignoring both their lovely flavor and nutritional components. So I started experimenting.

This side dish is root to stem at its best. Every inch of the carrot is deliciously edible! The greens themselves are a bit like its family member parsley,  a tiny bit bitter and grassy, but with a subtle after-flavor of carrot. However, the best reason to avoid the compost bin is the nutritional content of these scraps that are usually thrown away.

carrots with tops
Keep those greens! They are both edible and delicious!

Use as you would parsley, mint, or basil

You can use them raw or cooked in any dish where you would add parsley, mint, or even basil. A nice garnish, yes, but think soups and salads, stir-fries, guacamole, or, as in this recipe, a vibrant pesto.

Nutritional powerhouse!

With no fat and no cholesterol, carrot greens are a great source of Vitamins A, K, and C, iron, calcium, magnesium, protein, fiber, antioxidants, and phytonutrient rich chlorophyl. The greens are a detox star, and are also beneficial to the immune system, digestion, and bone health.

Nope, not poisonous!

So no, they are not poisonous, although they used to have the reputation. I believe this misconception arose because of the similarity in appearance between the wild carrot and hemlock!

This recipe makes more pesto than you need, so stash it in the refrigerator and use it to top other vegetables!

I plan to serve this at Easter dinner this year.

IMG_7166

Roasted Carrots with Carrot Top Pesto

  • 1 bunch of carrots with tops (about 12)
  • 1/4 plus 1 tbsp. cup dark amber maple syrup, divided
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • Knob fresh ginger
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 lemon, juice and zest

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.

Srub the carrots and cut off the tops, you do not need to peel them. Place them on a rimmed baking sheet. Chop the tops and save for the pesto, and reserve a few leaves to garnish if you like.

In a food processor, combine 3 tbp. of the maple syrup, the olive oil, garlic cloves, ginger, and salt and pepper to taste. Process until smooth, and remove one third of the mixture to the waiting carrots. Massage the mixture evenly over all the carrots and place on the middle rack of your preheated oven.

While they are cooking, add the chopped carrot tops to the remaining mixture in the food processor and add the lemon juice and zest. Process to smooth, adding a bit more olive oil or water to loosen up if necessary. You can also use a mortar and pestle if you like.

Of course, you can also add some nuts for texture if you like!

carrot top pesto
The carrot top pesto can be used on a lot more than carrots. Use it as a topping anywhere you would use traditional pestos from pasta to salads!

Roast the carrots until they are tender and caramelized. My carrots were small, so it only took 18 minutes, larger carrots would, of course, take longer.

Place the carrots on your serving dish and lightly drizzle the remaining tablespoon of maple syrup. Spoon over the pesto, and garnish with a few leaves if you like.

© Copyright 2020– or current year, The New Vintage Kitchen. Unattributed use of this material is strictly prohibited. Reposting and links may be used, provided that credit is given to The New Vintage Kitchen, with  active link and direction to this original post.

The New Vintage Kitchen does not accept ads or payment for mention of products or businesses.

Member of Slow Food

 

 

 

27 Comments Add yours

  1. Looks delicious! What a creative recipe!

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Savory. Just what the doctor ordered. 🌿🌱🍃

    Liked by 2 people

    1. You bet! This will be on the Easter menu.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. JOY journal says:

    This sounds good. I’ve never used them outside of soupstock. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I hand’t either except for the occasional garnish, and I was pleasantly surprised!

      Like

  4. simplywendi says:

    this sounds amazing!

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Hannah says:

    I tried Antoni Porowski’s recipe which is very similar and it was so delicious so I can only imagine how good this is!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I’ll have to look it up, thanks!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Ally Bean says:

    Well I’ll be! I didn’t know you could eat the tops of carrots. Now I’ve got another fun something to try. Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You are so very welcome Ally!

      Like

  7. Carolyn Page says:

    Dorothy, your humble carrot pesto has me salivating for sure! No, I’ve never used the carrot tops; they always make it into the compost. This must stop, of course. Will definitely be trying this soon; as soon as I use the carrots I’ve bought, which have had their tops removed.
    Your recipes have me thinking very differently. Thank You so much…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You are welcome! Enjoy those greens!

      Like

  8. Sounds yummy but never had pesto atop roasted carrots! I love pesto.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. It was delicious and the husband really loved them.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Your husband is a lucky man!❤️

        Liked by 2 people

  9. Wow, this is really creative, and sounds so good! You are a kitchen genius!
    Jenna

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Ah shucks! I am a food lover!!!! Especially my veggies.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. terrepruitt says:

    Awesome. I always throw the beautiful carrot greens away because I don’t know (besides smoothies) what to do with them!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I know! They have been neglected far too long!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. chef mimi says:

    Oh my! That does look wonderful! This is certainly one kind of pesto I’ve not tried!!!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I hadn’t either, and I was absolutely delighted!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Love the use of carrots tops this way. It’s a shame people throw them away. The same goes to beet greens.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I know, and radish greens, etc. All are edible, delicious, and somehow just got ignored!

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s